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Resource: Resume Info
Preparing Your Own Interview Questions
Thursday, October 18, 2012

Dress clothes, check! Copies of resume, check! Notepad and pen, check! Missing something?
 
One other thing that many interviewers fail to adequately prepare for are the questions they'll have when the interviewer inevitably asks at the end of the interview, "Do you have any questions?"
 
Preparing for an interview is like getting ready for your first day of class. Being unprepared can be pretty embarrassing, especally in an interview when you can't turn to anyone else and ask to borrow something. Not to mention that your every word and move is being critiqued.
 
Job seekers often get so wrapped up in perfect their answers that they overlooking putting together well-thought out questions. What's worse than not asking the right questions are not asking any at all. Knowing that you'll be expected to say something, it's better to make it count.
 
So how do you know which kinds of questions are the right ones to ask? Well, for starters it's not asking any of the wrong ones. The wrong questions include things such as salary, benefits, holidays, vacation time, etc. These questions show what's really on your mind and that they have nothing to do with the actual job or company. Your want to convince the company that you're there for them, not yourself.
 
Here are some examples of good questions to ask in an interview :
  • What was it that brought you to this company?
Every one has their own, unique reason for ending up where they do. Learning what those reasons are can tell you a lot about them. Asking the interviewer what their reason was expresses your genuine interest for who they are. It also provides some insight as to their values and personal view of the company.
  • What do you enjoy most about working here?
This is a basic and straight-forward question. It's an opportunity for the interviewer to tell you the good parts about working for the company as well as its strengths as an employer. Plus, it's another way to show interest in the interviewer's perspective.
  • How would you describe the company's culture?
Knowing what the company's culture is like is very important to determining whether you would be a good fit there. Asking during the interviews shows that you're thinking ahead. Interviewers are always taking into consideration your thought process based on your questions. This questions is an effective way of making a good impression.
  • What about the company do you think needs changes?
You can probably bet that not a lot of other candidates are asking this question. It's typically not something that many job seekers think about when they enter an interview. Companies are all about change and improvement. They want individuals who always have, "Now how can I make this better?" on their minds. Aside from potential brownie points, you'll also learn about what the interviewer thinks the company's weaknesses are.

Being armed with strong questions in an interview is just as important as delivering strong answers. You want your words to be effective and prompt the interviewer to do some deep thinking of their own. Often times, it's your questions that make them remember you, not your answers.